Potassium content is the main driver for salinity tolerance in sweet potato before tuber formation

Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is mostly grown in Asia, which accounts for 86% of global production. However, its production is under threat by salinity. Little is known about genotypic responses to salinity in sweet potato. Phenotypic responses or physiological processes linked to salt tolerance that could be developed into a reliable screening tool to assist breeding have not yet been developed for sweet potato. In a hydroponic cultivation system, 12 contrasting sweet potato genotypes were subjected to 0, 50, 100 and 150 mM root zone salinity (RZS). Genotypic thresholds for dry matter accumulation and the genotypic slopes for additional dry matter reduction when the RZS increased beyond the genotypic threshold were determined. Sodium, chlorine and potassium (K) were determined from above-ground biomass and correlated with the genotypic thresholds found. Genotypic threshold levels were linearly negatively correlated with the difference in tissue K content at 75 mM RZS and the tissue K content at control levels. Based on the genotypic ability to retain high tissue potassium levels under increasing RZS, we propose a screening tool based on these experimental data that can distinguish between salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive genotypes and indicate the potential yield level of the sweet potato genotypes.

Citation: Mondal, S.; Rahaman, E. H. M. S.; Asch, F. 2022. Potassium content is the main driver for salinity tolerance in sweet potato before tuber formation. Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science. ISSN 1439-037X.
2022-05-21
GENETIC RESOURCES, GENETICS, GENOMICS AND CROP IMPROVEMENT SCIENCES GGCI, SWEETPOTATO AGRI-FOOD SYSTEMS, SWEETPOTATOES

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