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Story


Papa Arariwa are the descendents of the pre-Incan cultures of Peru. They are the original potato guardians who have conserved and preserved the potato in its center of origin in Peru for millenia. The image of the Papa Arariwa was once seen in ancient textiles. It portrayed a farmer caring for potatoes. The International Potato Center honors the original Papa Arariwa by using this image as a logo so that we may remember these farmer scientist who passed down their traditions so that we might enjoy the food security and nutrition of the potato today.


The image of Papa Arariwa has been part of the CIP logo since its founding in 1971. Over the decades the logo has changed slightly. The contemporary logo includes Papa Arariwa holding both a potato stalk and a sweetpotato vine. Sweetpotato was adopted by CIP as a mandate crop in 1988. Though the sweetpotato has its origins in the Carribean and Central America, CIP's genebank in Lima, Peru conserves and preserves sweetpotato (a storage root) as well as its namesake potato (a tuber).

 

 

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Can I use the CIP logo in my publication? Yes you may use the CIP logo for non-commercial purposes with our permission. Please contact the CIP Communications Department to obtain permission and our branding guidelines.
  • Can I just use the Papa Arariwa image without the CIP acronym or name? The Papa Arariwa image and the CIP acronym and name must remain as a single image. They cannot be separated.
  • Why is CIP an acronym for the International Potato Center? Can I use IPC as an acronym? CIP stands for Centro Internacional de la Papa, the name of CIP in Spanish. We are not known as IPC. Using CIP as the acronym is advised.
  • Can I use the logo in black and white or change the dimensions? Please refer to our branding guidelines for guidance on the different forms the CIP logo can take including sizing, color, font, as well as usage for print, web and social media among other options.
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