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CGIAR is a global partnership that unites organizations engaged in research for a food secure future. With 15 centers around the world, CGIAR is dedicated to reducing rural poverty, increasing food security, improving human health and nutrition and ensuring more sustainable management of natural resources. Tackling these challenges, which are at the heart of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, requires research to identify state-of-the-art solutions and effective partnerships to deliver them.

The CGIAR Research Portfolio is structured around two interlinked clusters of challenge-led research programs: agri-food systems and global integrating programs. CIP leads the agri-food system CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas and participates in several global integrating programs. CIP also works closely with the CGIAR research support platforms.

   CGIAR Research Programs

Roots, Tubers and Bananas

Led by CIP

  • Genetic resources
  • Productive varieties and quality seed
  • Resilient crops
  • Nutritious food and added value
  • Improved livelihoods at scale

Policies, Institutions and Markets

Led by IFPRI

  • Technological innovation and sustainable intensification
  • Inclusive and efficient value chains
  • Social protection for agriculture
  • Gender research

Climate Change, Agriculture
and Food Security

Led by CIAT

  • Priorities and policies
  • Climate-smart technologies and practices

Agriculture for Nutrition and Health

Led by IFPRI

  • Food systems for healthier diets
  • Biofortification

    CGIAR Platforms

Big Data

Led by CIAT

  • Data generation, access and management
  • Big data and agricultural development
  • Big data analytics

Genebank Platform

Led by the Global Crop Diversity Trust

  • Conservation, use and policy
  • Quality management, Information systems
  • Germplasm health

Excellence in Breeding

Led by CIMMYT

  • Product design and management
  • Genotyping and phenotyping tools and services
  • Bioinformatics, biometrics and data management

Gender Platform

Led by ILRI

  • Research informs food system development
  • Methodologies to achieve gender equality
  • Alliances to strengthen outcomes
CIAT International Center for
Tropical Agriculture
CIMMYT International Maize and
Wheat Improvement Center
IFPRI International Food Policy
Research Institute
ILRI International Livestock
Research Institute

Our powerhouse crops

Potato

A potato contains about half the daily adult requirement of vitamin C and significant amounts of zinc, iron, potassium, and vitamin B.

China is the world’s largest producer, harvesting more than 73 million tons of potato a year.

More than a billion people worldwide eat potato as a staple food.

Potato can grow in almost any climate, from sea level to about 4,000 meters above sea level.

There are 5,000 different varieties of potato in CIP’s genebank, half of them can only be found in Peru.

Potato is the third most important food crop after rice and wheat and produces more calories per hectare than either of those grains.

Potato produces more food per unit of water than any other major crop.

Sweetpotato

Just 125 g of fresh orange-fleshed sweetpotato contains enough beta carotene to provide the daily vitamin A needs of a preschool-aged child. The crop is also a valuable source of vitamins B, C, and E.

Sweetpotato is also a healthy, cheap animal feed. Studies suggest that livestock fed on sweetpotato vines produce less methane, meaning its use could potentially mitigate global warming.

More than 105 million tons are produced globally each year, with 95% in developing countries.

Worldwide, sweetpotato is the sixth most important food crop after rice, wheat, potato, maize and cassava, but it ranks fifth in developing countries.

Sweetpotato is a storage root, not a tuber like the potato.

Sweetpotato can grow at altitudes from sea level to 2,500 meters above sea level, and comes in varieties ranging in color from white to yellow, orange or purple.

Our powerhouse crops

Potato

Sweetpotato

A potato contains about half the daily
adult requirement of vitamin C and
significant amounts of zinc, iron,
potassium, and vitamin B.

Just 125 g of fresh orange-fleshed
sweetpotato contains enough beta
carotene to provide the daily vitamin A
needs of a preschool-aged child. The crop is
also a valuable source of vitamins B, C, and E.

China is the world’s largest producer,
harvesting more than 73 million tons
of potato a year.

Sweetpotato is also a healthy, cheap animal
feed. Studies suggest that livestock fed on
sweetpotato vines produce less methane,
meaning its use could potentially mitigate
global warming.

More than a billion people worldwide
eat potato as a staple food.

More than 105 million tons are
produced globally each year, with
95% in developing countries.

Potato can grow in almost any climate,
from sea level to about 4,000 meters
above sea level.

Worldwide, sweetpotato is the sixth
most important food crop after rice,
wheat, potato, maize and cassava, but
it ranks fifth in developing countries.

There are 5,000 different varieties of
potato in CIP’s genebank, half of them
can only be found in Peru.

Sweetpotato is a storage root,
not a tuber like the potato.

Potato is the third most important food
crop after rice and wheat and produces
more calories per hectare than either of
those grains.

Sweetpotato can grow at altitudes from
sea level to 2,500 meters above sea level,
and comes in varieties ranging in color
from white to yellow, orange or purple.

Potato produces more food per unit of
water than any other major crop.

Social reach of scientific publications

Social reach of
scientific publications

2019 marked an outstanding year for CIP’s contribution to scientific knowledge as CIP scientists authored (or coauthored) 80 papers published in 66 different journals, nearly all of which are internationally recognized. In keeping with CIPs mandate to serve the public good, 56 of those articles (70%) are open access, freely available to all readers. The Altmetric scores below reflect not only the quality of the research but its relevance in on-going discussions in mass media, social media and public policy documents.

CIP publications are available to the public in CGSpace, the CGIAR’s research repository.

TOP 5
Altmetric scores

The origins and adaptation of European potatoes reconstructed from historical genomes
Nature Ecology & Evolution
https://hdl.handle.net/10568/102100

Crop variety management for climate adaptation supported by citizen science
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://hdl.handle.net/10568/99504

The new potato
Science
https://hdl.handle.net/10568/99352

A taxonomic monograph of Ipomoea integrated across phylogenetic scales
Nature Plants
https://hdl.handle.net/10568/106083

Understanding the consequences of changes in the production frontiers for roots, tubers and bananas
Global Food Security
https://hdl.handle.net/10568/100098

ABOUT

CIP is a CGIAR research center with a focus on potato, sweetpotato and Andean roots and tubers. It delivers innovative science-based solutions to enhance access to affordable nutritious food, foster inclusive sustainable business and employment growth, and drive the climate resilience of root and tuber agri-food systems. Headquartered in Lima, Peru, CIP has a research presence in more than 20 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. www.cipotato.org

CGIAR is a global research partnership for a food-secure future. Its science is carried out by 15 research centers in close collaboration with hundreds of partners across the globe. www.cgiar.org

CIP ACHIEVEMENTS

CREDITS

Discovery to Impact
Science-based solutions for global challenges

International Potato Center | Annual Report 2019
© 2020, International Potato Center
ISSN 0256-6311
DOI: 10.4160/02566311/2018
Hecho el Depósito Legal en la Biblioteca Nacional del Perú  N° 2005-9640 

Readers are encouraged to quote or reproduce material from this report. As copyright holder, CIP requests acknowledgement and a copy of the publication where the citation or material appears. Please send this to the Communications Department at the address below. 

International Potato Center
Av. La Molina 1895, La Molina, Peru
Apartado 1558, Lima 12, Peru
cip@cgiar.org
www.cipotato.org 

Direction
James Stapleton 

Managing editor
Christopher Butler 

Writing 
David Dudenhoefer (consultant) 

Production coordinator
Cecilia Lafosse 

Multimedia productions
Sara Fajardo
Hugh Rutherford
Isabel Corthier 

Web development
Moises Rosario
Andrea Prado 

Design and infographics
José Enrique Torres 

Photo captions and credits 

Sliders:
Sweetpotato vine distribution in Mozambique (CIP/I. Corthier).
Jan Kreuze in the lab. (Credit CIP/J. Torres).
Genetic markers facilitate breeding resilient potatoes with characteristics local people want. (Credit CIP/H. Rutherford).

Sub-menus:

Discovery:
Jan Kreuze in the lab. (Credit CIP/J. Torres)

Innovation:
Ms Tirhas Woldu and her daughters, of Tigray, Ethiopia, enjoy orange-fleshed sweetpotato. (Credit CIP/A.Frezer)

Impact:
A combination of sweetpotato planting material, agronomic training and nutrition education has helped millions of rural families improve their food and nutrition security. (Credit CIP/I. Corthier)

Next-generation breeding:
Research assistant Monica Santayana works on a project to crossbreed potato and its wild relatives (Crop Trust/M. Major).

Stopping sweetpotato pathogens:
Scientist Barack Wanjawa tests the LAMP assay for sweetpotato viruses in Kenya (KALRO/A. Mulwa).

Triple advantage:
By storing sweetpotatoes in dry sand and using them to produce planting material, farmers are able to plant and harvest the nutritious crop earlier (CIP/M. Cherinet).

Potatoes for prosperity:
Farmer Doris Kagendo Gikunda, of Meru county, with the high-yielding CIP potato variety Unica (CIP/V. Atakos).

Sweet resilience:
Thousands of farmers received sweetpotato planting material to replace crops destroyed by Cyclone Idai (CIP/I. Corthier).

Asian appetites:
Nutrition education in Bangladesh (CIP/S.Quinn)

CIP at a glance:
Credit CIP/H. Rutherford

CIP in CGIAR:
Credit CIP/I. Corthier

Board of Trustees:
Credit CIP/J.Torres

July 2020 

CREDITS

Discovery to Impact
Science-based solutions for global challenges

International Potato Center | Annual Report 2019
© 2020, International Potato Center
ISSN 0256-6311
DOI: 10.4160/02566311/2018
Hecho el Depósito Legal en la Biblioteca Nacional del Perú  N° 2005-9640 

Readers are encouraged to quote or reproduce material from this report. As copyright holder, CIP requests acknowledgement and a copy of the publication where the citation or material appears. Please send this to the Communications Department at the address below. 

International Potato Center
Av. La Molina 1895, La Molina, Peru
Apartado 1558, Lima 12, Peru
cip@cgiar.org
www.cipotato.org 

Direction
James Stapleton 

Managing editor
Christopher Butler 

Writing 
David Dudenhoefer (consultant) 

Production coordinator
Cecilia Lafosse 

Multimedia productions
Sara Fajardo
Hugh Rutherford
Isabel Corthier 

Web development
Moises Rosario
Andrea Prado 

Design and infographics
José Enrique Torres 

Photo captions and credits 

Sliders:
Sweetpotato vine distribution in Mozambique (CIP/I. Corthier).
Jan Kreuze in the lab. (Credit CIP/J. Torres).
Genetic markers facilitate breeding resilient potatoes with characteristics local people want. (Credit CIP/H. Rutherford).

Sub-menus:

Discovery:
Jan Kreuze in the lab. (Credit CIP/J. Torres).

Innovation:
Ms Tirhas Woldu and her daughters, of Tigray, Ethiopia, enjoy orange-fleshed sweetpotato. (Credit CIP/A.Frezer).

Impact:
A combination of sweetpotato planting material, agronomic training and nutrition education has helped millions of rural families improve their food and nutrition security. (Credit CIP/I. Corthier).

Next-generation breeding:
Research assistant Monica Santayana works on a project to crossbreed potato and its wild relatives (Crop Trust/M. Major).

Stopping sweetpotato pathogens:
Scientist Barack Wanjawa tests the LAMP assay for sweetpotato viruses in Kenya (KALRO/A. Mulwa).

Triple advantage:
By storing sweetpotatoes in dry sand and using them to produce planting material, farmers are able to plant and harvest the nutritious crop earlier (CIP/M. Cherinet).

Potatoes for prosperity:
Farmer Doris Kagendo Gikunda, of Meru county, with the high-yielding CIP potato variety Unica (CIP/V. Atakos).

Sweet resilience:
Thousands of farmers received sweetpotato planting material to replace crops destroyed by Cyclone Idai (CIP/I. Corthier).

Asian appetites:
Nutrition education in Bangladesh (CIP/S.Quinn).

CIP at a glance:
Credit CIP/H. Rutherford

CIP in CGIAR:
Credit CIP/I. Corthier

Communication data 2019:
Credit CIP/S. Quinn

Board of Trustees:
Credit CIP/J.Torres

July 2020 

ABOUT  | CIP ACHIEVEMENTS | CREDITS

ABOUT  | CIP ACHIEVEMENTS | CREDITS

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