INNOVATIONS

Orange-fleshed sweetpotato puree for nutritious food productss

INNOVATIONS

Orange Fleshed Sweetpotato puree for nutritious food products

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    IMPACT AREAS
  • Nutrition & food securitySocial
  • Gender equality, youth & social inclusion
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    GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE
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    TYPE OF INNOVATION
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    Biophysical science
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    Genetic (varieties and breeds)
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    Production systems and management practices
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    Research and communication methodologies and tools
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    Social science
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    MATURITY LEVEL

Adoption or impact at scale.

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    STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT

Taken up by ‘next users’

Toolbox for Seed Systems of Roots, Tubers and Bananaa

Recognition of the health benefits of pro-vitamin A orange-fleshed sweetpotato (OFSP) has inspired the crop’s utilization in processed products such as pre-cut, cubed, mashed or pureed sweetpotato. In the US, some schools have added sweetpotato puree to the lunch menu to boost the nutrition quality of those meals. CIP scientist have shown that orange-fleshed sweetpotato (OFSP) puree is a functional ingredient for the bakery industry. We have developed breads in which 45-50% of the wheat flour has been replaced with OFSP puree, making it a good source of vitamin A while reducing the amount of sugar and oil bakers use – as well as often-imported flour – thereby cutting production costs. OFSP puree-based products retain more nutrients, making them healthier food than standard wheat products.

As Africa’s population grows, urbanizes, and becomes more affluent, the demand for local, safe and nutritious foods is increasing, opening opportunities for OFSP puree innovations. Successful OFSP puree bread commercialization in Kenya, Malawi and Rwanda offers a glimpse of how OFSP puree can reduce the double burden of malnutrition in Africa and beyond. However, OFSP puree is a perishable product, requiring a cold chain, which is unavailable in most of Africa. CIP thus developed a shelf-stable, vacuum-packed OFSP puree that is increasing the supply of OFSP puree and making it available during the months between harvest seasons. This shelf-stable OFSP puree is the breakthrough technology for the expanded use of biofortified OFSP in Africa. It is enabling the development of a growing selection of OFSP-based products, including breads, buns and biscuits. Just two slices of OFSP bread provide 10% of an adult’s daily vitamin A requirement. 

OFSP puree has enabled the creation of new products, businesses and income opportunities on and off farm, for women and young people employed along the supply chain. In Kenya alone, demand for OFSP puree is valued at more than USD 5 million annually. By generating demand for OFSP, it has helped increased the crop’s market value, inspiring more farming families to grow and consume it, while making pro-vitamin A products available to consumers in urban areas. We are now exploring puree use in humanitarian assistance programs, to extend its nutrition benefits to even more people.

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    FUNDERS

The CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas (RTB), the CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH), the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the United Kingdom Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Irish Aid, Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), the European Union, the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), German Technical Cooperation (GIZ), the state government of Odisha in India, McCain Foods Ltd, the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), the African Development Bank (AfDB),and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).

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    PARTNERS

African Union Commission, the Scaling-Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement and Business Network, the Technical Secretariat for Food and Nutrition Security (SETSAN) in Mozambique, the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA), North Carolina State University (NCSU), the Natural Resources Institute at the University of Greenwich, Emory University, Michigan State University, Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Concern Universal (now United Purpose), Save the Children, World Vision, the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH), Helen Keller International (HKI), Farm Concern International (FCI), Farm Africa, Imbaraga (Rwanda), the World Food Programme, the Relief Society of Tigray, the Tigray Women’s Association, People in Need (Ethiopia), Gana Unnayan Kendra, BRAC, Tuskys Kenya Ltd, Urwibutso Enterprises (Rwanda), Euro-Ingredients Ltd, Burton & Bamber Ltd (Kenya), McCain Foods South Africa Ltd, and Sinnovatek Inc.

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